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AUGUST 2015: . At Little Tokyo . . . KATHIE FOLEY-MEYER and AL LONGO . . Starts AUG 16 . . CONNIE DK LANE and WILLIAM LANE. . .SEPTEMBER 2015. . . At Little Tokyo . . . LORE ECKELBERRY . . At the Brewery Annex . . MIKE SAIJO, PATRICK QUINN and MEI XIAN QIU. . .LA Artcore has served Los Angeles for 36 years as a 501(c)3 nonprofit, and relies entirely on gifts from the public - please support our mission and make a donation today.
AUGUST / SEPTEMBER 2015

LA Artcore Union Center for the Arts (Little Tokyo)


LA Artcore Brewery Annex
(Lincoln Heights)



Aug 16 - Sep 6

KATHIE FOLEY-MEYER
AL LONGO


Aug 16 - Sep 6

CONNIE DK LANE
WILLIAM LANE



Opening Reception:
Sunday, August 23, 2015 3-5PM
Conversation with the Artists: 4PM


PRESS RELEASE

LA Artcore is pleased to announce an exhibit featuring Al Longo and Kathie Foley-Meyer whose distinct approaches in medium and content combine to produce an exhibit of visual contrasts that root into the nature of experience. The multimedia installation of Los Angeles-based artist and concept designer Kathie Foley-Meyer centers around photographs and video she shot of ordinary African-American citizens participants in Los Angeles' annual Martin Luther King Parade on the commencement of President Barack Obama's election in 2008 and his reelection in 2012. Foley-Meyer's project explores the conditions of representation of African-Americans  in North-American culture often from a local perspective.
As many artists can attest to, much of an artist's immediate and surrounding environment is consciously and unconsciously channeled into their art. As observed by Al Longo, the artist's perspective shifted both culturally and geographically upon leaving New York to join the Navy in the mid-1950's. Ending up in rural Northern California with his wife, Longo's process involves the contemplation of nature as the source element in its translation from oil paint.



Artist Reception:

Sunday Aug 23, 2015, 3– 5 p.m.
Conversation With The Artist Series at 4 p.m.

L.A. Artcore at Union Center for the Arts
120 Judge John Aiso St., Los Angeles, CA 90012
Gallery hours: 12-5 p.m., Wed-Sun.

(Pranay Reddy)




 



Opening Reception:
Sunday, August 23, 2015 1-3PM
Conversation with the Artist: 2PM


PRESS RELEASE

In a fascinating survey of evidence for the claim 'opposites attract', husband and wife artists Connie D.K. Lane and William Lane are strikingly polarized in their artistic voices, choice of medium and materials. Perhaps there is also a strain of lively competition in there, as they are prolific and present solid bodies of work.

Connie's work is organic, often appearing to be something you could almost pluck from the earth, but of such character and involved manipulation, the sort of earthy thing that would made you stop the car and investigate in the first place. Tendrils, branches, fibers and pouches create structures that can only come from an artist deeply invested in the expression of the human-nature relationship. For a mature artist who is beginning her career recently, completing her MFA at CSU Long Beach in 2011, we have the opportunity to see where training and experience really introduce their own pragmatic momentum.

William Lane, born in Kalamazoo and long time resident of California, produces work that is by contrast Hard Edge, working with pure color and firm, succinct line, and the relationship of color placed adjacently by the artist into a composition. Directly calling to mind Josef Albers, he too pays homage to the square, but with the more liberal reins of color relationship of Frederick Hammersley or Frank Stella. William is no imitator, he has been teaching art and making this kind of work since the 60's, and is a living witness, member and continuation of Hard Edge abstraction which was unveiled just as his own education as an artist was beginning.



Artist Reception:

Sunday Aug 23, 2015, 1– 3 p.m.
Conversation With The Artists at 2 p.m.



L.A. Artcore Brewery Annex

650A S. Ave. 21, Los Angeles, CA 90031
Gallery hours: 12-5 PM, Wednesday - Sunday

(Robert Seitz)





LA ARTCORE - UNION CENTER FOR THE ARTS  


LA ARTCORE - BREWERY ANNEX  



Little Tokyo

120 Judge John Aiso Street
Los Angeles, CA 90012
(213) 617-3274

Hours: Wed-Sun 12-5PM


Lincoln Heights

650 A South Avenue 21
Los Angeles, CA 90031
(323) 276-9320

Hours: Wed-Sun 12-5PM

 


Sep 9 - 30

LORE ECKELBERRY


Sep 10 - Oct 1

MEI XIAN QIU
MIKE SAIJO
PATRICK QUINN



Opening Reception:
Sunday, September 13, 2015 3-5PM
Conversation with the Artists: 4PM


PRESS RELEASE

L.A. Artcore is pleased to present Los Angeles artist Lore Eckelberry's solo exhibit at its Union Center for the Arts space featuring forty works of sculptural portraiture as well as portraiture on canvas. In her most recent creative development, Eckelberry constructs matrices of bounded skateboard decks using them as blank surfaces upon which her subjects are tenderly hand-painted. Eckelberry's overall body of work depicts the artist's cadre of close friends, family and family pets that are portrayed with emphasis on the celebratory way in which they are produced, where the likenesses of her subjects are subjected to the spirit out which they are produced as echoed in high-key color palettes of stark contrasts and centralized compositions. Eckelberry's style has evolved in relationship to the artist's multicultural experiences and international travels whose revelation of cultural diversity has underscored Eckelberry's investigation of humanity.

 



Artist Reception:

Sunday Sep 13, 2015, 3– 5 p.m.
Conversation With The Artist Series at 4 p.m.

L.A. Artcore at Union Center for the Arts
120 Judge John Aiso St., Los Angeles, CA 90012
Gallery hours: 12-5 p.m., Wed-Sun.

(Pranay Reddy)




 



Opening Reception:
Sunday, September 13, 2015 1-3PM
Conversation with the Artist: 2PM


PRESS RELEASE


LA Artcore presents an exhibit of three artists with different approaches to what it means to be an artist, and what the art they make is for.

Mei Xian Qiu has created a photo series called “Let a Thousand Flowers Bloom”, referencing the famous Mao reform program, in which she imagines a Chinese Communist takeover of the United States. Using this scenario, she explores the misconceptions and bad translations the West uses to view China, the imagery of romance routinely found in propaganda, but with tongue in cheek references to the immorality such propaganda is frequently criticizing, such as homosexuality, religion, and Hollywood decadence. Born as an illegal migrant in Java, she was given four names in preparation for various possible outcomes of the Communist killings they fled. Her art is an expression of uncertainty, of life shaped by social fear, and the use of humor and art to transcend them.

Mike Saijo found a way to make art that interfaces with his intellectual interests and an expression on the role of an artist in our society. Drawing from an intense interest in linguistics, theory, and literature, pages that nourished his mind become the actual surface onto which he applies his images; as an example, arranged selections from Kahlil Gibran’s The Prophet become a substrate for the image of a tree. The images are applied using xerographic methods that he describes as mathematical, and which he regards as Democratic. This is a reflection of his generation, which greeted the arrival of photocopy printing methods with enthusiasm, making self-publishing a major new voice in the arts. He uses this print method as a double-entendre reference to the access created by that technology, and the access to culture present in the printed word.

Patrick Quinn is an assemblage artist who uses a range of media to create what he describes as rough, emotional work. He blends salvaged materials with found objects, photographs and other story-telling elements to create something new out of discarded and dispossessed components. Using stained glass methods, welding and screen printing to expand them, his goal is to create a story that draws the viewer to interpret the work. Steadily exhibiting in Los Angeles institutions and beyond since 2004, he is also well known for his Halloween and Dia De Los Muertos themed installations, which find themselves in festivals and as backdrops for performances, in addition to gallery settings.

 



Artist Reception:

Sunday Sep 13, 2015, 1– 3 p.m.
Conversation With The Artists at 2 p.m.



L.A. Artcore Brewery Annex

650A S. Ave. 21, Los Angeles, CA 90031
Gallery hours: 12-5 PM, Wednesday - Sunday

(Robert Seitz)





< - - AUGUST 2015



OCTOBER 2015 - - >


RICK OGINZ

TOM CASTELAZO
MIKE VEGAS
JEFF IORILLO



 

MICHAEL FLETCHNER

KALOUST GUEDEL
EXCESSIVIST INTITIATIVE

 


 

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